A  Master’s Degree is expensive to get, how do you plan to pay for yours?

Our guest, Robin Henle, is a public health nurse for the Benton County Health District.  She has attended college on multiple occasions and is now going back for her master’s degree.  We talked to her about her experiences and got into the nitty-gritty of how she paid for her advanced education.

Many college-bound students have plans for pursuing their master’s.  But they haven’t thought about how they‘ll pay for it or how they’ll fund their life along the way.  A master’s degree is an investment, both in money and time.  Many who attempt to get theirs have unexpected trouble along the way.  Robin shares her story here to help students be prepared for what it is really like to tackle both work and school.

Robin and some of her children have been through college and managed to graduate with very little debt.  Robin’s first two trips to college were paid out of her income and by scholarships she earned.  However, her third time back to school, she graduated with $30,000 in debt.  Robin was lucky when her father paid off her debt as a gift to her.  You will hear Robin talk of how they had planned to pay off the debt on their own and her advice on the topic.

She is a member of the Soroptimists and she talks about how that group encourages young women to apply for a scholarship sponsored by the group.

Be sure to listen to the whole interview to learn other valuable tips and advice for those planning to get an advanced degree.

If you haven’t tuned into our previous shows we invite you to listen.  Each one includes advice from professionals and people who have dealt with some of the same struggles you might be going through. 

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